Five Common St. Patrick’s Day Myths Debunked

St. Patrick’s Day Myths
Not everything you’ve hear about St. Patrick’s Day is true. We’ve decided to bust a few St. Patrick’s Day myths to spread some little-known knowledge.

As with any holiday, there are lots of ideas and preconceptions surrounding St. Patrick’s Day that people don’t know about or just flat-out aren’t true. We’ve decided to bust a few St. Patrick’s Day myths to spread some little-known knowledge.

Myth: St. Patrick Was Irish

Reality: St. Patrick was from Britain, which was at the time a part of the Holy Roman Empire. He was kidnapped at 16 and taken to Ireland as a slave.

Myth: Parades Have Always Been a Part of the Festivities

Reality: The first St. Paddy’s Day parade happened in the United States to honor Irish soldiers in the English army.

Myth: St. Patrick Used the Shamrock to Explain the Trinity

Reality: It’s a popular legend that St. Patrick used the shamrock to explain the Holy Trinity to converts in Ireland, but there’s no historical documentation proving this.

Myth: Leprechauns Have Always Been Short, Green-Clad Men

Reality: While the word Leprechaun comes from “luchorpan,” which translates to “little body,” the term originally described native water spirits and eventually got crossed with multiple other legends from fairy folklore.

Myth: Corned Beef and Cabbage is An Irish Dish

Reality: Pork and potatoes is a more authentic, traditional dish. Corned beef and cabbage originated in the United States when poor Irish immigrants used Jewish corned beef to flavor their cabbage by boiling them together.

See a St. Patrick’s Day myth you thought was interesting? We at Midland Buick GMC Cadillac are glad to help you out.

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